Periodontal Disease

Periodontal simply means “the tissue around the teeth.” Periodontists specialize in the treatment and surgery of this area, which is often characterized by gum disease. Plaque is the most common element causing gum disease.

Unfortunately, periodontal-related problems are often discovered after they have persisted for an extended period of time. Proper oral hygiene, daily dental care and regular dental checkups will minimize the risk of gum disease. Gum disease ranges from mild (gingivitis) to moderate (periodintitis) to the severe (periodontitis). Treatments are available for every case of gum disease.
Common problems associated with gum disease:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or when eating certain foods
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

The effects of gum disease can be damaging to your dental health. However, through proper preventive care and oral hygiene, you can avoid problems associated with gum disease.


The Mouth-Body Connection

Infections in the mouth can play havoc elsewhere in the body. Evidence suggests that people with periodontal disease are at higher risk for developing heart disease, stroke, uncontrolled diabetes, preterm births, and respiratory disease. Periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. This article suggests steps you can take to protect your health.

Protecting Children's Oral Health

Studies indicate that gingivitis (the first stage of periodontal disease) is nearly a universal finding in children and adolescents. Advanced forms of periodontal disease are more rare in children than adults, but can occur. This article describes the types of periodontal diseases, signs of periodontal disease in children, and suggests some preventive measures.

Women and Periodontal Disease

Hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman's life can affect many tissues, including gum tissue. Because periodontal disease is often a "silent" disease, many women do not realize they have it until it reaches an advanced state. However, at each stage of your life, there are steps a woman can take to protect her oral health.

Smoking & Other and Periodontal Disease Risk Factors

Recent studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. In addition, following periodontal treatment or any type of oral surgery, the chemicals in tobacco can slow down the healing process and make the treatment results less predictable.